Presenting Research in Diverse Settings

How we communicate research often varies according to who the stakeholders are, the environment in which we're presenting, and what we want the audience to do with the information we provide them. Thus, one important skillset researchers hone is how to frame our research within those parameters!

I've presented research to many different stakeholders, in various formats, for all kinds or reasons like decision-making, education, training, and more. Above and beyond shaping presentations around the parameters described above, it's important to make them accessible so that people of all disciplinary backgrounds can stay engaged and contribute to an intellectual conversation! Below are some examples of how I applied this skillset to craft presentations for different stakeholders and in various settings.

Policy Brief: Assessment of Hiring Algorithms in Québec

In this presentation designed for (hypothetical) provincial legislators, we discuss how local and federal governments have addressed algorithmic discrimination and what the Québec government can do to modify their hiring initiatives, programs, and practices. Thanks to my collaborators, Sofia Gil-Clavel, Feinuo Sun, & Jennifer Suliteanu for their contributions to our work on algorithmic discrimination in employment algorithms!

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It's Not Personal: Understanding Resilience from a Structural Perspective

This event adopts the structure of shows like "Dragons' Den" and "Shark Tank." CAnD3 fellows had two slides and two minutes to tell compelling data stories to a panel of judges who are experts in data visualization and storytelling, using visualization skills they honed in the program.

I used this opportunity to share analyses from my dissertation, and share their implications for how we understand and encourage "resilience" as a society. Most importantly, this evidenced my ability to tailor presentations according to an audience's level of expertise.